Blossom trackers

Each cherry blossom area in High Park is represented with a chart below to show the average amount of buds and blossoms are currently visible. Buds are shown as yellow, cherry blossoms are pink, and leaves / bare branches are green. You can even hover (mouse) or tap (finger) each colour area to view the percentage (%) value.

Updated March 20, 2019

Tracker colour Legend

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Buds
(tracks % of buds near opening)

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Cherry Blossoms
(tracks % of flowers visible)

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Leaves/Branches
(tracks % of leaves/branches visible)


High Park Trail (near Grenadier Restaurant)

Sports Fields (near Bloor St Entrance)

By Grenadier Pond & Dock

Children's Playground / High Park Zoo

Fugenzo / Akebono (Late Bloomers)

 

Bud to Bloom Stages

Predicting exactly when the blooms is always a bit tricky from year to year. Fluctuating and extreme weather conditions will significantly affect bud development. This could vary the blooming date from a few days to even weeks beyond average times. Usually, peak bloom throughout High Park occurs during the weeks of late April and early May.

 
 
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Stage 1
Buds begin to show bronze colour

Late February to mid-March

Stage 1: The first signs of development show small to medium sized buds. They can range from chestnut brown to bronze in colour. Healthy buds have an elongated, 'egg' like shape. In years of extreme weather, damaged buds instead look long, thin, with a less bulbous shape.

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Stage 2


Buds change to green colour

Late March to early April

Stage 2: Green tips now begin to be visible on the buds. Red or brown shades can usually be seen near the tips of each bud. Buds are still in an early stage and well protected from the cold weather which can slow down the development.

 
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Stage 3

Buds swell and

Florets are Visible

Early to mid-April, Average 16-21 days to Peak Bloom

Stage 3: Larger, round green buds begin to swell and become more pronounced in size and shape as the florets start to show. Some buds even begin to display spots of deep pink.

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Stage 4

Buds continue to swell with Florets extending

Mid April to early May, Average 12-17 days to Peak Bloom

Stage 4: As buds have swollen to their largest size, florets begin to extend and elongate. Each floret represents a cherry blossom which will fade through colours of deep pink to white once they are fully open.

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Stage 5
Florets turn pink and begin to extend

Late April to early May, Average 6-10 days to Peak Bloom

Stage 5: Florets now begin to extend (Peduncle Elongation) display the beginnings of individual blossoms with combinations of deep and bright pink colours. Now extremely vulnerable, frost or sudden drops can damage or even kill the blossoms at this stage as happened in 2008 when a sudden cold snap resulted in no flowers blooming that year.

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Stage 6

Blossoms open with white petals

Average 4-6 days to Peak Bloom

Final stage: The highlight of the Sakura // Cherry Blossoms when the pink florets begin to open into bright, white blossoms throughout the park entirely. Each area of the park starts to bloom within a day or so apart. Peak (full) bloom offers an inspirational spectacle for all to see for the next 1-2 weeks (weather permitting).